Treatments & Funding

There has been a bit of news about new cancer therapies for children recently which is of course great news.

However we can’t ignore the fact that historically childhood cancer has received very little attention; it still has a long way to go.

The following is taken from an article written for the Telegraph in 2016 Dr David Walker:

“I’ve been a children’s cancer doctor for 30 years and in that time over a third of my young patients have died due to treatments that failed or were too toxic. For at least half of them, the sheer rarity of their condition meant there wasn’t a clinical trial for them to explore the most modern treatments. The Cancer Drugs Fund, created to ration treatment for adults, affords children no special status and frequently denies them both new and existing therapies.

So-called “rare” cancers are collectively as common as the “common” ones. But the perception that research should be funded according to incidence means that individual rare cancers are doomed forever to receive a fraction of the money we shovel into the big four adult cancers. The result is a disregard of half of the cancer world, a one-sided picture…”. “For children’s cancers this means they are hidden in plain sight, highly visible to the public through their emotional media appeal for the big cancer charities, yet screened out of the research funding system by their “rare” cancer status”. The Cancer Drugs Fund, created to ration treatment for adults, affords children no special status and frequently denies them both new and existing therapies. “Do we continue to let drugs companies set a commercially driven pecking order for the development of new treatments? And if we give the public a voice in priority setting, how do they make their voices heard? Should government step in and give the necessary boost to rare and children’s cancers through regulation?”.

You can read the full article here:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/children/12140533/We-need-to-think-about-how-we-fund-childrens-cancer.html

This is a list of the treatments Dylan’s had, when they were developed & how many he’ll have received by April 2020.

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